A Taste of Hunger — Looking for a Bliss Point in Life

REVIEW/NATION
The bells are ringing, the screen's black. "If you ask me what I want, I'll tell you. I want everything" — the quote by Kathy Acker, an American novelist, acts as a starting point for Christoffer Boe's new drama A Taste of Hunger (2021). It may not appear as an obvious motto, but as the plot escalates, its significance becomes apparent. Acker's ability to "mirror the reader's soul" transferred into the movie, reflecting the characters' true intentions and minds.
by Polina Galaganova


30/09/2021
The movie takes off in the middle of the story — two powerful people, a husband and a wife, in the same kitchen, deciding on the menu of a Michelin-worthy restaurant. There's not much information about either of them, but their characters are very prominent. Karsten (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) seems to be somewhat of a gentle and passionate lover, Maggie (Katrine Greis-Rosenthal) is a wise and strong-willed partner leading him. They are surrounded by the sudden darkness — a dream of their own, the ancestral sin, the forbidden fruit.

However, the tables have turned since the beginning of the movie. The story is bent in an unusual way, as the director proposes, making it more fulfilling and interesting. One day in the life of Karsten and Maggie is split by chapters. Each one has a name. "Sweet" is for Karsten and Maggie's first meeting, "Salty" — for the climax point of the story. The chapters have specific colours and perspectives on the characters' life.
When asked about the structure, Boe said it was the best way of working alongside his script-mate Tobias Lindholm:

"He {Lindholm} is very realistic… I'm not sure what reality actually is… We work very differently… But we wanted to work on this… One of the great ways of doing that was doing chapters. So he could do chapter one, I could do chapter two, we could write each other's chapters."
Boe's style is very prominent. As the story progresses, the colours and the places change. The memories, presented in the chapters, appear closer to nature, they're brighter and calmer, although they show the ugliest parts of the characters' lives. The present scenes are darker, the lights are dimmed — they depict the turning point of Karsten and Maggie's relationship.

The plot in itself is very spine-thrilling, gripping. There's a gut feeling, a constant wait for a sudden twist — the viewer expects one but may get a completely different scene in return. The movie is a wild white-knuckle ride, it pushes the boundaries of familiar concepts: love, family, friendships. Watching A Taste of Hunger is dangerous, suddenly a few quotes or homages might reveal the flagrancy of beliefs.

A Taste of Hunger shows people losing their family to work and loneliness, children crying in despair and throwbacks to Lars von Trier. What better way to reconsider your life choices than by watching a good movie.
 
A Taste of Hunger — Looking for a Bliss Point in Life
NATION
The bells are ringing, the screen's black. "If you ask me what I want, I'll tell you. I want everything" — the quote by Kathy Acker, an American novelist, acts as a starting point for Christoffer Boe's new drama A Taste of Hunger (2021). It may not appear as an obvious motto, but as the plot escalates, its significance becomes apparent. Acker's ability to "mirror the reader's soul" transferred into the movie, reflecting the characters' true intentions and minds.
by Polina Galaganova


30/09/2021
The movie takes off in the middle of the story — two powerful people, a husband and a wife, in the same kitchen, deciding on the menu of a Michelin-worthy restaurant. There's not much information about either of them, but their characters are very prominent. Karsten (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) seems to be somewhat of a gentle and passionate lover, Maggie (Katrine Greis-Rosenthal) is a wise and strong-willed partner leading him. They are surrounded by the sudden darkness — a dream of their own, the ancestral sin, the forbidden fruit.

However, the tables have turned since the beginning of the movie. The story is bent in an unusual way, as the director proposes, making it more fulfilling and interesting. One day in the life of Karsten and Maggie is split by chapters. Each one has a name. "Sweet" is for Karsten and Maggie's first meeting, "Salty" — for the climax point of the story. The chapters have specific colours and perspectives on the characters' life.
When asked about the structure, Boe said it was the best way of working alongside his script-mate Tobias Lindholm:

"He {Lindholm} is very realistic… I'm not sure what reality actually is… We work very differently… But we wanted to work on this… One of the great ways of doing that was doing chapters. So he could do chapter one, I could do chapter two, we could write each other's chapters."
Boe's style is very prominent. As the story progresses, the colours and the places change. The memories, presented in the chapters, appear closer to nature, they're brighter and calmer, although they show the ugliest parts of the characters' lives. The present scenes are darker, the lights are dimmed — they depict the turning point of Karsten and Maggie's relationship.

The plot in itself is very spine-thrilling, gripping. There's a gut feeling, a constant wait for a sudden twist — the viewer expects one but may get a completely different scene in return. The movie is a wild white-knuckle ride, it pushes the boundaries of familiar concepts: love, family, friendships. Watching A Taste of Hunger is dangerous, suddenly a few quotes or homages might reveal the flagrancy of beliefs.
A Taste of Hunger shows people losing their family to work and loneliness, children crying in despair and throwbacks to Lars von Trier. What better way to reconsider your life choices than by watching a good movie.
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