Broken Law – One More Irish Criminal

REVIEW/NATION
by Albina Akhatova
23.03.2021
The crime genre is a significant component of Irish cinematography, along with epic historical films about the Civil War and the Northern Irish conflict, musical dramas and stories about testing the boundaries. This is controversial, given that Ireland entered the top-10 of the safest countries in the world in 2019, but the activities of the Irish mafia outstripped the focus of Irish politics on comfort and tranquillity. A big part of the Irish world-famous films consists of precisely action movies and thrillers about criminals and policemen: The Guard (2011), Love/Hate (2010-2014), Perrier's Bounty (2009), In Bruges (2007), Ripper Street (2012-2016).
The debut director Paddy Slattery, who has been previously engaged in short films, has decided to start his features walking down a familiar path. The movie's plot is well-known and the cast is trust-worthy: the actors have repeatedly worked with each other. John Connors has already starred in the Irish Film&Drama Awards short film nominee Skunky Dog (2014): Paddy calls him "an old head on young shoulders'' Slattery also sees Tristan Heanue who has worked with Connors on a short film Today (2015) as a young Henry Ford. All three creators met at the set of Broken Law (2020) and look what came of that.
Joe is released from prison and immediately gets in trouble: his old pals do not let him start a new life and drag him into a credit center robbery. By coincidence, Joe's older brother, police officer Dave, comes to the same place at the same time. Being off duty, he interferes with the robbers and chases Joe down the street until he gives up. The stolen money remains in Dave's apartment, while Joe's accomplices decide that he has deceived them and want revenge. Dave will have to fight the temptation of leaving the money to himself and test his principles: he is overworking, the economic situation in the country is unfavorable, and the rent is increasing.
The director focuses on the contrast between completely different brothers: Joe asks rhetorically: how come they have been born in the same family? After all, he is a criminal, a playboy and a weak-willed person who said that he is not going to get high and drunk on his first day of release, but five minutes later he is already smoking weed.And Dave is the most honest police officer who does not take bribes and saves people, even when, technically, he can not do it with a clear conscience. However, he is weighed down by the ghost of his father.He was a flawless cop and died on duty when Dave was just 13 years old. The father becomes his role model and an icon,who Dave aspires to be. However, the unexpected truth about the parent breaks the patterns of Dave's behaviour, as the ending emphasizes.

Speaking of the ending. The film pleases with its plot twists and how a set of circumstances provide screenplay, but the ending is predictable and – therefore, disappointing. The tragedy is expected because the whole story and Dave's gradual descent into the breaking of the law lead to it. The happy ending elicits frustration. It'd be better if the good guy died fighting disgusting pricks.
The main idea of the movie develops around the ability to be flexible and to reconsider our principles and positions if they are based on distorted ideas especially. Set as a crime thriller, the film manoeuvers between social, family and domestic drama, often falling into one or the other but anyway remains a story about how everyone breaks the laws — both state and moral.
 
Broken Law – One More Irish Criminal

REVIEW/NATION
by Albina Akhatova
23.03.202
The crime genre is a significant component of Irish cinematography, along with epic historical films about the Civil War and the Northern Irish conflict, musical dramas and stories about testing the boundaries. This is controversial, given that Ireland entered the top-10 of the safest countries in the world in 2019, but the activities of the Irish mafia outstripped the focus of Irish politics on comfort and tranquillity. A big part of the Irish world-famous films consists of precisely action movies and thrillers about criminals and policemen: The Guard (2011), Love/Hate (2010-2014), Perrier's Bounty (2009), In Bruges (2007), Ripper Street (2012-2016).
The debut director Paddy Slattery, who has been previously engaged in short films, has decided to start his features walking down a familiar path. The movie's plot is well-known and the cast is trust-worthy: the actors have repeatedly worked with each other. John Connors has already starred in the Irish Film&Drama Awards short film nominee Skunky Dog (2014): Paddy calls him "an old head on young shoulders'' Slattery also sees Tristan Heanue who has worked with Connors on a short film Today (2015) as a young Henry Ford. All three creators met at the set of Broken Law (2020) and look what came of that.

Joe is released from prison and immediately gets in trouble: his old pals do not let him start a new life and drag him into a credit center robbery. By coincidence, Joe's older brother, police officer Dave, comes to the same place at the same time. Being off duty, he interferes with the robbers and chases Joe down the street until he gives up. The stolen money remains in Dave's apartment, while Joe's accomplices decide that he has deceived them and want revenge. Dave will have to fight the temptation of leaving the money to himself and test his principles: he is overworking, the economic situation in the country is unfavorable, and the rent is increasing.
The director focuses on the contrast between completely different brothers: Joe asks rhetorically: how come they have been born in the same family? After all, he is a criminal, a playboy and a weak-willed person who said that he is not going to get high and drunk on his first day of release, but five minutes later he is already smoking weed.And Dave is the most honest police officer who does not take bribes and saves people, even when, technically, he can not do it with a clear conscience. However, he is weighed down by the ghost of his father.He was a flawless cop and died on duty when Dave was just 13 years old. The father becomes his role model and an icon,who Dave aspires to be. However, the unexpected truth about the parent breaks the patterns of Dave's behaviour, as the ending emphasizes.

Speaking of the ending. The film pleases with its plot twists and how a set of circumstances provide screenplay, but the ending is predictable and – therefore, disappointing. The tragedy is expected because the whole story and Dave's gradual descent into the breaking of the law lead to it. The happy ending elicits frustration. It'd be better if the good guy died fighting disgusting pricks.
The main idea of the movie develops around the ability to be flexible and to reconsider our principles and positions if they are based on distorted ideas especially. Set as a crime thriller, the film manoeuvers between social, family and domestic drama, often falling into one or the other but anyway remains a story about how everyone breaks the laws — both state and moral.
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