Language Lessons — From the Internet with Love

REVIEW/NATION
The Zoom era looks like something that might become perennial — the pandemic and its consequences are going to be with us for at least five more years. In these conditions, people are atomized even more, being separated by rectangular windows of the app designed to unite. However, the distance and the need to be locked up may bring light and happiness into people's lives in some cases. Sounds paradoxical, but this is exactly the story of Adam (played by Mark Duplass who is the co-writer and the founder of Duplass Brothers Production that produced the picture) and Cariño (Natalie Morales), who met each other in Language Lessons (2021), directed by the latter.
by Anastasia Ageeva


17/10/2021
Both a man and a woman show affection, but exclusively in a friendly manner — Adam is married to a man who, by the way, bought him these 100 lessons of Spanish. The mutual sympathy arises instantly — Cariño knows how to listen and when to ask a clarifying question directly to the point, Adam jokes well and from the very beginning appears to be an open book. This is a symbiosis in which you do not need to learn grammar and choose the right conjugation — it seems that the very fact of communication is more important for both of them.

At some point, it seems that there is no silver lining behind the dark Zoom screen for characters' relations — and the characters have to find a common language, not even English or Spanish. Their disunity is emphasized by the video messages that they send to each other: while Adam diligently expresses his feelings in Spanish, Cariño holds him at bay and answers back in English. It is interesting that her initial selfish aspirations turn out to be a sign of a good friend in the end — even if up to this moment we somewhat hate her.
The whole story resembles the Soviet narrative French Lessons by Valentin Rasputin — there is also a cinematic version of 1978 if you would like to know more. Russian distributors took its structure of naming and translated Language Lessons as Spanish Lessons which is really thoughtful. The audience acquainted with Rasputin's creation sees the similarities these stories share. His version of the story of two people in trouble who find hope next to each other is more mature because of the nature of their problems which include matters of life and death.

Due to the lack of visual material in the film, there cannot be said enough about how the director plays with shots and angles. To be honest, this is even better — the audience is so interested in what the characters say, feel, and show with their facial expressions, that it might not have desire or time to examine the mise-en-scène. And it does not carry a lot of sense all the same, because the main piece in this museum of real human feelings, that are less and less common, are Adam and Cariño.

In general, Language Lessons are about two people who suddenly find themselves in need of a friend. So, fate had given them a million-to-one shot — and the two continents were connected during the pandemic.
 
Language Lessons — From the Internet with Love
REVIEW/NATION
The Zoom era looks like something that might become perennial — the pandemic and its consequences are going to be with us for at least five more years. In these conditions, people are atomized even more, being separated by rectangular windows of the app designed to unite. However, the distance and the need to be locked up may bring light and happiness into people's lives in some cases. Sounds paradoxical, but this is exactly the story of Adam (played by Mark Duplass who is the co-writer and the founder of Duplass Brothers Production that produced the picture) and Cariño (Natalie Morales), who met each other in Language Lessons (2021), directed by the latter.
by Anastasia Ageeva


17/10/2021
Both a man and a woman show affection, but exclusively in a friendly manner — Adam is married to a man who, by the way, bought him these 100 lessons of Spanish. The mutual sympathy arises instantly — Cariño knows how to listen and when to ask a clarifying question directly to the point, Adam jokes well and from the very beginning appears to be an open book. This is a symbiosis in which you do not need to learn grammar and choose the right conjugation — it seems that the very fact of communication is more important for both of them.

At some point, it seems that there is no silver lining behind the dark Zoom screen for characters' relations — and the characters have to find a common language, not even English or Spanish. Their disunity is emphasized by the video messages that they send to each other: while Adam diligently expresses his feelings in Spanish, Cariño holds him at bay and answers back in English. It is interesting that her initial selfish aspirations turn out to be a sign of a good friend in the end — even if up to this moment we somewhat hate her.
The whole story resembles the Soviet narrative French Lessons by Valentin Rasputin — there is also a cinematic version of 1978 if you would like to know more. Russian distributors took its structure of naming and translated Language Lessons as Spanish Lessons which is really thoughtful. The audience acquainted with Rasputin's creation sees the similarities these stories share. His version of the story of two people in trouble who find hope next to each other is more mature because of the nature of their problems which include matters of life and death.

Due to the lack of visual material in the film, there cannot be said enough about how the director plays with shots and angles. To be honest, this is even better — the audience is so interested in what the characters say, feel, and show with their facial expressions, that it might not have desire or time to examine the mise-en-scène. And it does not carry a lot of sense all the same, because the main piece in this museum of real human feelings, that are less and less common, are Adam and Cariño.
In general, Language Lessons are about two people who suddenly find themselves in need of a friend. So, fate had given them a million-to-one shot — and the two continents were connected during the pandemic.
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