Minamata – Look Around

REVIEW
by Anastasiia Preizner
28.11.2020
The life of a small person has always been oppressed by the interests of large companies or government representatives. Authority, that is caused by money, is put at the priority while ordinary people who earn their living by hard work are forced to be content with what they will get after "big people". And this situation seems to be everywhere all around the world. If you do not believe, watch Minamata (2020) and learn more about the problem.
The movie, directed by Andrew Levitas, contains a real story of an environmental disaster that occurred in the small Japanese city Minamata. In the 1970s there was an active emission of mercury waste from the local factory directly into the sea where local residents fished. After that, some kind of disease began to spread in the city mutating a person's genes and making them disabled for their whole life.
To somehow help human beings, suffering from such cruelty of the factory owners, one young Japanese woman went to the United States to find so – called Eugene Smith. Who was he? Actually, just an alcoholic who used to be the best photographer for the newspaper Life, but then lost touch with his children and got drunk constantly. After a quick acquaintance and a short thought, the main character and the woman fly to Minamata to prepare some photo material about this horrible situation in the city and to tell the whole world about it.
The role of the main character was given to Johnny Depp who did a great job. He was so deeply immersed in it that it was impossible to believe the same man had once played Jack Sparrow or Willy Wonka. Following the way of thinking of Eugene Smith, you begin to see that each photo made by the main character contains a part not only of the soul of a person being photographed, but also of the photographer himself.

The movie makes the audience sit in suspense because every single detail of Minamata literally takes the viewers' breath away. On the faces of people who watch it there is sometimes a smile from witty jokes uttered by the character of Johnny Depp, and then sometimes tears begin to flow from the realization of the helplessness of ordinary people in this cruel world.

The director showed in detail how the small, private life of a person, the interests of business and the state are intertwined. We see a caring mother bathing her completely blind and disabled daughter in the bath. We see a teenager with disfigured hands and feet from the disease trying to learn how to take pictures to show the world that he is also special. We see women who had to start working hard to support their families because the men got sick and became unable to earn money. And we also see a businessman who, disdaining common people, offers the main character a bribe for silence. And all this is happening in the background of environmental disasters that are appearing all over the world.
The end of the film leaves a feeling of utter desolation. You feel like you have been crushed, torn apart, slammed against a wall and thrown in the trash. This feeling of emptiness and dirt inside you are unlikely to be expected. The movie is clearly worth watching because such sobering "pills" are needed in order to understand how many problems are happening around us and we do not even notice them.
 
Minamata – Look Around
REVIEW
by Anastasiia Preizner
28.11.2020
The life of a small person has always been oppressed by the interests of large companies or government representatives. Authority, that is caused by money, is put at the priority while ordinary people who earn their living by hard work are forced to be content with what they will get after "big people". And this situation seems to be everywhere all around the world. If you do not believe, watch Minamata (2020) and learn more about the problem.
The movie, directed by Andrew Levitas, contains a real story of an environmental disaster that occurred in the small Japanese city Minamata. In the 1970s there was an active emission of mercury waste from the local factory directly into the sea where local residents fished. After that, some kind of disease began to spread in the city mutating a person's genes and making them disabled for their whole life.

To somehow help human beings, suffering from such cruelty of the factory owners, one young Japanese woman went to the United States to find so – called Eugene Smith. Who was he? Actually, just an alcoholic who used to be the best photographer for the newspaper Life, but then lost touch with his children and got drunk constantly. After a quick acquaintance and a short thought, the main character and the woman fly to Minamata to prepare some photo material about this horrible situation in the city and to tell the whole world about it.

The role of the main character was given to Johnny Depp who did a great job. He was so deeply immersed in it that it was impossible to believe the same man had once played Jack Sparrow or Willy Wonka. Following the way of thinking of Eugene Smith, you begin to see that each photo made by the main character contains a part not only of the soul of a person being photographed, but also of the photographer himself.
The movie makes the audience sit in suspense because every single detail of Minamata literally takes the viewers' breath away. On the faces of people who watch it there is sometimes a smile from witty jokes uttered by the character of Johnny Depp, and then sometimes tears begin to flow from the realization of the helplessness of ordinary people in this cruel world.

The director showed in detail how the small, private life of a person, the interests of business and the state are intertwined. We see a caring mother bathing her completely blind and disabled daughter in the bath. We see a teenager with disfigured hands and feet from the disease trying to learn how to take pictures to show the world that he is also special. We see women who had to start working hard to support their families because the men got sick and became unable to earn money. And we also see a businessman who, disdaining common people, offers the main character a bribe for silence. And all this is happening in the background of environmental disasters that are appearing all over the world.
The end of the film leaves a feeling of utter desolation. You feel like you have been crushed, torn apart, slammed against a wall and thrown in the trash. This feeling of emptiness and dirt inside you are unlikely to be expected. The movie is clearly worth watching because such sobering "pills" are needed in order to understand how many problems are happening around us and we do not even notice them.
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