Rose Plays Julie – An Eerie Thriller Where Acting and Reality Entwine

REVIEW/NATION
by Marina Shchelokova
01.04.2021
The news of adoption sets the action of Rose Plays Julie (2019) going. It is the revelation resulting in a series of cloakings and disclosures. At some point, it is hard to tell one from another.
Rose (Ann Skelly), a veterinary student at a Dublin university, gets stumbled by the complete non-acquaintance with her own identity. Knowing nothing of her parents or the story of her birth, she soothes herself with the hope of being wanted. Rose's original name — Julie. This mysterious Julie-girl in Rose's mind is someone she should've been all along: short-haired and, apparently, bad-ass. Julie will enter the play later.

Silences, signs and stares — that's what Rose is at a start. Just as lifeless as the animals she reluctantly puts down at her classes. The movie is indeed scaresome from the very beginning. Death seems to be stepping on the plot's toes. Dog, cow, horse, deer. The continuation of the list seems only natural.
The closer we get to the irretrievable, the more of Julie we see. Shy and quiet Rose finds the strength to contact her biological mother and she gets more decisive every minute. A shade of a medieval fairytale (previously expressed in neverending mist) reaches its climax during mother-daughter first real conversation. Rose and Ellen (Orla Brady) stand in the middle of the woods when the lurid "I was raped" is uttered.
The whole scene is the plaster finally being torn off the nagging wound. All these years and Ellen still cannot pronounce his name. She's clearly been a good actress, both literally and figuratively.

After Rose learns about her father — an archeologist named Peter (Aiden Guillen) — Julie and her bobbed wig take over. Having put her disguise on, she's taking off the masks of others quicker and quicker: Ellen's daughter learns about the existence of a sister, Peter uncovers that a girl he's almost raped shares his blood (yes, we talk about Rose), Peter's wife finds out her husband is a cheater and an offender.

Being Julie, Rose awakens herself from the life-long dream. Concealing the truth from others, she's in fact revealing her true self. So is it really "Rose plays Julie" or "Julie has been playing Rose for too long"?

No doubt, one of the main issues raised in the movie is sexual assault. Here it is closely connected to the identity crisis. Ellen tries to put not just Julie but a part of herself to adoption. She tries to get rid of the past, yet it comes crawling back. Pregnancy, Peter's impunity, — everything is being thoroughly neglected. Neglected not because of ignorance but because of pain and desperate desire to live on. Putting masks on seems to be a decent painkiller. Finding out the same man tried to assault your daughter — a strong side-effect.

We're going further and further down the blood brick road. Blood is flowing through an entire movie. Peter, crying over a corpse of deer he's just "released" from suffering, is a scene so uncanny, it makes your guts tighten up. The next one released will be Peter himself.

Attempted by Rose, murder is completed by Ellen. A cold dish of revenge she warms up with an intense conversation with her assaulter. Having met him at THE place after more than 20 years, she reminds Peter of every detail of that day. Ellen opens up about feeling ashamed, "dirty", unable to speak up.
The weapon is a syringe. Peter is put down like a misbehaved animal after a short fight and a nod. He finally washes his greasepaint off looking himself in the real face. Peter's not a good person. For him, it is a revelation indeed.
 
Rose Plays Julie – An Eerie Thriller Where Acting and Reality Entwine


REVIEW/NATION
by Marina Shchelokova
01.04.2021
The news of adoption sets the action of Rose Plays Julie (2019) going. It is the revelation resulting in a series of cloakings and disclosures. At some point, it is hard to tell one from another.
Rose (Ann Skelly), a veterinary student at a Dublin university, gets stumbled by the complete non-acquaintance with her own identity. Knowing nothing of her parents or the story of her birth, she soothes herself with the hope of being wanted. Rose's original name — Julie. This mysterious Julie-girl in Rose's mind is someone she should've been all along: short-haired and, apparently, bad-ass. Julie will enter the play later.

Silences, signs and stares — that's what Rose is at a start. Just as lifeless as the animals she reluctantly puts down at her classes. The movie is indeed scaresome from the very beginning. Death seems to be stepping on the plot's toes. Dog, cow, horse, deer. The continuation of the list seems only natural.

The closer we get to the irretrievable, the more of Julie we see. Shy and quiet Rose finds the strength to contact her biological mother and she gets more decisive every minute. A shade of a medieval fairytale (previously expressed in neverending mist) reaches its climax during mother-daughter first real conversation. Rose and Ellen (Orla Brady) stand in the middle of the woods when the lurid "I was raped" is uttered.
The whole scene is the plaster finally being torn off the nagging wound. All these years and Ellen still cannot pronounce his name. She's clearly been a good actress, both literally and figuratively.

After Rose learns about her father — an archeologist named Peter (Aiden Guillen) — Julie and her bobbed wig take over. Having put her disguise on, she's taking off the masks of others quicker and quicker: Ellen's daughter learns about the existence of a sister, Peter uncovers that a girl he's almost raped shares his blood (yes, we talk about Rose), Peter's wife finds out her husband is a cheater and an offender.

Being Julie, Rose awakens herself from the life-long dream. Concealing the truth from others, she's in fact revealing her true self. So is it really "Rose plays Julie" or "Julie has been playing Rose for too long"?

No doubt, one of the main issues raised in the movie is sexual assault. Here it is closely connected to the identity crisis. Ellen tries to put not just Julie but a part of herself to adoption. She tries to get rid of the past, yet it comes crawling back. Pregnancy, Peter's impunity, — everything is being thoroughly neglected. Neglected not because of ignorance but because of pain and desperate desire to live on. Putting masks on seems to be a decent painkiller. Finding out the same man tried to assault your daughter — a strong side-effect.

We're going further and further down the blood brick road. Blood is flowing through an entire movie. Peter, crying over a corpse of deer he's just "released" from suffering, is a scene so uncanny, it makes your guts tighten up. The next one released will be Peter himself.

Attempted by Rose, murder is completed by Ellen. A cold dish of revenge she warms up with an intense conversation with her assaulter. Having met him at THE place after more than 20 years, she reminds Peter of every detail of that day. Ellen opens up about feeling ashamed, "dirty", unable to speak up.
The weapon is a syringe. Peter is put down like a misbehaved animal after a short fight and a nod. He finally washes his greasepaint off looking himself in the real face. Peter's not a good person. For him, it is a revelation indeed.
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