The Letter Room – We All Want To Be Loved

REVIEW/NATION
Has Oscar Isaac already evinced his status of the actor of this autumn? Most likely, yes. With at least three big projects premiered in September, Isaac now turns to a lesser budget (and, perhaps, less salient) short film The Letter Room (2020) — which, admittedly, gained an overall accolade from the biggest festivals in the US.
by Violetta Efimova


16/10/2021
Written and directed by a Danish documentarian Elvira Lind, who coincidentally happens to be Oscar Isaac's wife, The Letter Room captures a very short period of time in the life of Richard, a prison officer. The main character here is a pure incarnation of a gracious image which is inherent to cinema, but quite rare for reality: a corrections officer who never misses a chance to help his inmates at least in the slightest degree. When he's offered to be transferred to the letter room, Richard's life, full of dull evenings with microwave-heated meals and drama series on TV tête-à-tête with his dog, becomes permeated with a bizarre inspiration. Reading letters to prisoners from their loved ones, Richard, who is an already loving-his-job type of person, finds another reason for his occupation. It's almost like the private messages from children to their convicted parents or from people missing their partners make Isaac's character feel like lacking these things in his own life.
The Letter Room might be conceived of as a single character movie — even if there're a few minor characters, they fade into the background in comparison to Richard. The plot merges into Richard's personality, explores his own perception of somebody else's thoughts in letters. Such a scrupulous focus may be the reason why the whole seemingly serious situation becomes truly risible — Isaac wearing a ludicrous mustache and surreptitiously reading other people's letters, literally like an inquisitive teenager.
The whole moral of the film passes through the ambiguous and to some extent cruel truth — letters written to inmates are a lie, but it's a white lie. Feelings that people put into written words merely don't exist anymore. The bond may be gone for a long time, but countenance is the only thing that can make prisoners still keep their spirits up. This is exactly what Richard reveals for himself and tries to follow this suit. Even though his trick is very soon exposed.
 
The Letter Room – We All Want To Be Loved
REVIEW/NATION
Has Oscar Isaac already evinced his status of the actor of this autumn? Most likely, yes. With at least three big projects premiered in September, Isaac now turns to a lesser budget (and, perhaps, less salient) short film The Letter Room (2020) — which, admittedly, gained an overall accolade from the biggest festivals in the US.
by Violetta Efimova


16/10/2021
Written and directed by a Danish documentarian Elvira Lind, who coincidentally happens to be Oscar Isaac's wife, The Letter Room captures a very short period of time in the life of Richard, a prison officer. The main character here is a pure incarnation of a gracious image which is inherent to cinema, but quite rare for reality: a corrections officer who never misses a chance to help his inmates at least in the slightest degree. When he's offered to be transferred to the letter room, Richard's life, full of dull evenings with microwave-heated meals and drama series on TV tête-à-tête with his dog, becomes permeated with a bizarre inspiration. Reading letters to prisoners from their loved ones, Richard, who is an already loving-his-job type of person, finds another reason for his occupation. It's almost like the private messages from children to their convicted parents or from people missing their partners make Isaac's character feel like lacking these things in his own life.
The Letter Room might be conceived of as a single character movie — even if there're a few minor characters, they fade into the background in comparison to Richard. The plot merges into Richard's personality, explores his own perception of somebody else's thoughts in letters. Such a scrupulous focus may be the reason why the whole seemingly serious situation becomes truly risible — Isaac wearing a ludicrous mustache and surreptitiously reading other people's letters, literally like an inquisitive teenager.

The whole moral of the film passes through the ambiguous and to some extent cruel truth — letters written to inmates are a lie, but it's a white lie. Feelings that people put into written words merely don't exist anymore. The bond may be gone for a long time, but countenance is the only thing that can make prisoners still keep their spirits up. This is exactly what Richard reveals for himself and tries to follow this suit. Even though his trick is very soon exposed.
Made on
Tilda