Venom – Love Will Tear Us Apart

REVIEW
The story of a loser journalist who picked up an alien disease in the form of a symbiote could have been a success. There have been several attempts to bring Venom to life on screen: he appeared here and there in cartoons and Marvel's Spider-Man films, got a bad costume in the first film adaptation, so generally searched for a long time for his true owner. Finally, in 2019, the symbiote was taken in by Tom Hardy as Eddie Brock — and here we go. Despite scathing reviews from critics and film buffs, the film made a huge box office. Moreover, the average viewer was more than pleased: the friendship between a symbiote and a human sharing one body has not been told in such a hilarious way so far. The odd duo keep fighting evil, this time in Venom: Let There Be Carnage (2021).
by Naya Guseva


6/10/2021
Apart from Tom Hardy, Woody Harrelson (Cletus Cassidy) now has an "alien butt buddy" too. His name is Carnage and this symbiote is much bigger, meaner and nastier. Not surprisingly, after all, Carnage became a symbiote of the serial killer. The result is an amoral and rather frightening villain, plus, he hates Venom. And we'd love to tell you why, but there's a hint: the age-old problem of fathers and children involved. We've got the villain, but he can be left behind for a while now. The main storyline isn't about him at all — here's the main feature of Venom.

Let's think of the standard superheroes or villains who get superpowers. They go through all the stages of denial and then start sticking with the new virtue ethics. But Eddie doesn't get excited about his new living superpower and Venom doesn't try to improve things. they quarrel, share territory and wobble in an attempt to defend their gastronomic predilections instead.

"They don't have an understanding and it pisses both of them off. Eddie can't even go to the bathroom without fear of Venom violating his personal space," says Tom Hardy.

The symbiote really doesn't care at all what Brock thinks. This is where one of the most unexpected acts of the entire film takes place. They have a more clear relationship shown in the two films than many other characters in entire franchises. There's a feeling that this is actually a rom-com, just with action added. Be warned right away: no queerbaiting. These two have professed their love for each other in every issue of the classic comic book. The director of the second film, Andy Serkis, was even thinking of a different title:
Not really, nothing to do with Lethal Protector at this point. We did think for a moment it might be called Love Will Tear Us Apart, that was a going concern for a little while. But Let There Be Carnage just seems to do it. There wasn't a lot of fighting over the other titles we were thinking of. Because this was such a strong contender.

https://screenrant.com/venom-2-carnage-alternate-title-joy-division-song/
Let's go back from the fighting sweethearts to the point of the film. We have two duos (understand as you like) with their own goals and problems. Cletus Cassidy, after decades within the prison walls, escapes from there not without the help of Carnage and seeks out his love Frances Barrison, aka Shriek, who has been sitting in a guarded cell in the basement all these years. They reunite and decide to introduce themselves as Bonnie and Clyde — except that one of them has an almost unkillable symbiote and the other is a deadly squealer. The "cliché" stamp should appear at this point. It gets even worse when the villains are naturally fighting against the "we are Venom." More hackneyed is given by the beloved trope when the two about to break up coming back together for a common cause. Smells like a rom-com again, doesn't it? The Venom films are actually just a guide on how to use compromise and conversation to build relationships. If you assess the film with a straightface, it's certainly a failed attempt. Flat villains driven by the"we'll get back at them all" motif, and all the emphasis is shifted to the main characters trying to come to terms with the adage "love is blind." This is perhaps the most unusual thing about the film: the visuals are nothing new, the jokes don't surpass the first part. Venom works like a Christmas tree — we see it every year and remember what it looks like but still rejoice.
Despite the new trashy reviews, Venom collects one of the biggest box offices of the pandemic and isn't about to stop. We don't want to spoil it but rest assured, the post-credits scene promises us more Venom on screen.

So we suggest a compromise, as the film teaches us. Let's treat Venom like a child: it's clumsy and makes silly jokes, but sweet and does it from the heart. Hope this love doesn't tear us all apart.
 
Venom – Love Will Tear Us Apart
REVIEW
The story of a loser journalist who picked up an alien disease in the form of a symbiote could have been a success. There have been several attempts to bring Venom to life on screen: he appeared here and there in cartoons and Marvel's Spider-Man films, got a bad costume in the first film adaptation, so generally searched for a long time for his true owner. Finally, in 2019, the symbiote was taken in by Tom Hardy as Eddie Brock — and here we go. Despite scathing reviews from critics and film buffs, the film made a huge box office. Moreover, the average viewer was more than pleased: the friendship between a symbiote and a human sharing one body has not been told in such a hilarious way so far. The odd duo keep fighting evil, this time in Venom: Let There Be Carnage (2021).
by Naya Guseva


6/10/2021
Apart from Tom Hardy, Woody Harrelson (Cletus Cassidy) now has an "alien butt buddy" too. His name is Carnage and this symbiote is much bigger, meaner and nastier. Not surprisingly, after all, Carnage became a symbiote of the serial killer. The result is an amoral and rather frightening villain, plus, he hates Venom. And we'd love to tell you why, but there's a hint: the age-old problem of fathers and children involved. We've got the villain, but he can be left behind for a while now. The main storyline isn't about him at all — here's the main feature of Venom.

Let's think of the standard superheroes or villains who get superpowers. They go through all the stages of denial and then start sticking with the new virtue ethics. But Eddie doesn't get excited about his new living superpower and Venom doesn't try to improve things. they quarrel, share territory and wobble in an attempt to defend their gastronomic predilections instead.

"They don't have an understanding and it pisses both of them off. Eddie can't even go to the bathroom without fear of Venom violating his personal space," says Tom Hardy.

The symbiote really doesn't care at all what Brock thinks. This is where one of the most unexpected acts of the entire film takes place. They have a more clear relationship shown in the two films than many other characters in entire franchises. There's a feeling that this is actually a rom-com, just with action added. Be warned right away: no queerbaiting. These two have professed their love for each other in every issue of the classic comic book. The director of the second film, Andy Serkis, was even thinking of a different title:
Not really, nothing to do with Lethal Protector at this point. We did think for a moment it might be called Love Will Tear Us Apart, that was a going concern for a little while. But Let There Be Carnage just seems to do it. There wasn't a lot of fighting over the other titles we were thinking of. Because this was such a strong contender.

https://screenrant.com/venom-2-carnage-alternate-title-joy-division-song/

Let's go back from the fighting sweethearts to the point of the film. We have two duos (understand as you like) with their own goals and problems. Cletus Cassidy, after decades within the prison walls, escapes from there not without the help of Carnage and seeks out his love Frances Barrison, aka Shriek, who has been sitting in a guarded cell in the basement all these years. They reunite and decide to introduce themselves as Bonnie and Clyde — except that one of them has an almost unkillable symbiote and the other is a deadly squealer. The "cliché" stamp should appear at this point. It gets even worse when the villains are naturally fighting against the "we are Venom." More hackneyed is given by the beloved trope when the two about to break up coming back together for a common cause. Smells like a rom-com again, doesn't it? The Venom films are actually just a guide on how to use compromise and conversation to build relationships.

If you assess the film with a straightface, it's certainly a failed attempt. Flat villains driven by the"we'll get back at them all" motif, and all the emphasis is shifted to the main characters trying to come to terms with the adage "love is blind." This is perhaps the most unusual thing about the film: the visuals are nothing new, the jokes don't surpass the first part. Venom works like a Christmas tree — we see it every year and remember what it looks like but still rejoice.
Despite the new trashy reviews, Venom collects one of the biggest box offices of the pandemic and isn't about to stop. We don't want to spoil it but rest assured, the post-credits scene promises us more Venom on screen.

So we suggest a compromise, as the film teaches us. Let's treat Venom like a child: it's clumsy and makes silly jokes, but sweet and does it from the heart. Hope this love doesn't tear us all apart.
Made on
Tilda