5 Belorussian Directors You Need To Follow

SHOTS/NATION
by Ivan Kuznetsov
28.08.2020
In the past few years some of the modern Belorussian directors were able to make their way to the international contests. Ever since, their popularity has been increasing. Check out the most notable directors and their works.
Julia Shatun
Julia Shatun is a young and ambitious filmmaker whose talent has already been assessed internationally. Her debut movie Tomorrow (2017) has become the first Belorussian film to ever compete with other debut motion pictures in Cannes, Karlovy Vary and Locarno. The movie was also presented at the FIDMarseille International contest. Shatun was able to accurately depict the dreary life details she had faced herself while living in a Belorussian town Mozyr. Tomorrow is a film with a strong distinctive style and an extremely dismal atmosphere. Julia persuaded her parents to take part in what was initially intended to be a home video. Eventually, her father and mother became the main characters of the movie. In her interview for Minsk-news Julia admitted that in the first script she had tried to vent her "great pain".
Dmitri Makhomet
Dmitri Makhomet is probably one of the most sophisticated modern Belorussian directors. Makhomet developed his authentic style at Le Frenois School in France. One of his first works was Forgotten in Narvilishky (2014). The film tells a story of a small village at the Lithuanian border. Makhomet's movie called You Won't Come Back Here (or The Wind Misses Me) (2016) is another feature film to be considered: a regular family comes to a distant village to bid farewell to their house. Dmitri is a frequent Locarno contestant, so he is definitely worth your attention.
Dmitri Dedok
Dmitri Dedok is an experimental director from Minsk. He is known for his documentary Between Heaven and Earth (2016) - a story about two friends who had to get through the 1990s together and now look back at the darkest of days from two different points of view. The movie is perfectly styled and shot taking into account Dmitri's lack of professional experience. He is one of the most promising Belorussian directors.
Andrew Kutilo
Andrew Kutilo is a pioneer of Belorussian documentary. His 2016 movie 25 shows the rough consequences of the independence proclaimed by Belarus. Kutilo depicts the lost generation, their everyday routine and unfulfilled aspirations. Andrew claims he doesn't care if some of the facts are not accurate because he always tries to leave room for fiction. Kutilo's movies are rich with political subtext and melancholy.
Nikita Lavretski
Nikita Lavretski is a young creative director. He is one of the most notable contestants of a Belorussian film festival Listapad. In 2016 Nikita presented his movie Love and Partnership which was highly rated by the viewers. Nikita is extremely diverse and enthusiastic. Lavretski has a YouTube channel where he tries his hand in different genres. Also, he sometimes arranges Q&A sessions and interviews with his friend directors and actors. In 2019 Nikita collaborated with Julia Shatun on his feature film Drama. Some say Lavretski's style is rather weird and inconsistent but he has proved his artistic opulence by winning at several national film festivals.
 
5 Belorussian Directors You Need To Follow

SHOTS
by Ivan Kuznetsov
28.08.2020
In the past few years some of the modern Belorussian directors were able to make their way to the international contests. Ever since, their popularity has been increasing. Check out the most notable directors and their works.
Julia Shatun
Julia Shatun is a young and ambitious filmmaker whose talent has already been assessed internationally. Her debut movie Tomorrow (2017) has become the first Belorussian film to ever compete with other debut motion pictures in Cannes, Karlovy Vary and Locarno. The movie was also presented at the FIDMarseille International contest. Shatun was able to accurately depict the dreary life details she had faced herself while living in a Belorussian town Mozyr. Tomorrow is a film with a strong distinctive style and an extremely dismal atmosphere. Julia persuaded her parents to take part in what was initially intended to be a home video. Eventually, her father and mother became the main characters of the movie. In her interview for Minsk-news Julia admitted that in the first script she had tried to vent her "great pain".
Dmitri Makhomet
Dmitri Makhomet is probably one of the most sophisticated modern Belorussian directors. Makhomet developed his authentic style at Le Frenois School in France. One of his first works was Forgotten in Narvilishky (2014). The film tells a story of a small village at the Lithuanian border. Makhomet's movie called You Won't Come Back Here (or The Wind Misses Me) (2016) is another feature film to be considered: a regular family comes to a distant village to bid farewell to their house. Dmitri is a frequent Locarno contestant, so he is definitely worth your attention.
Dmitri Dedok
Dmitri Dedok is an experimental director from Minsk. He is known for his documentary Between Heaven and Earth (2016) – a story about two friends who had to get through the 1990s together and now look back at the darkest of days from two different points of view. The movie is perfectly styled and shot taking into account Dmitri's lack of professional experience. He is one of the most promising Belorussian directors.
Andrew Kutilo
Andrew Kutilo is a pioneer of Belorussian documentary. His 2016 movie 25 shows the rough consequences of the independence proclaimed by Belarus. Kutilo depicts the lost generation, their everyday routine and unfulfilled aspirations. Andrew claims he doesn't care if some of the facts are not accurate because he always tries to leave room for fiction. Kutilo's movies are rich with political subtext and melancholy.
Nikita Lavretski
Nikita Lavretski is a young creative director. He is one of the most notable contestants of a Belorussian film festival Listapad. In 2016 Nikita presented his movie Love and Partnership which was highly rated by the viewers. Nikita is extremely diverse and enthusiastic. Lavretski has a YouTube channel where he tries his hand in different genres. Also, he sometimes arranges Q&A sessions and interviews with his friend directors and actors. In 2019 Nikita collaborated with Julia Shatun on his feature film Drama. Some say Lavretski's style is rather weird and inconsistent but he has proved his artistic opulence by winning at several national film festivals.
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