5 Situations When John Kramer Contradicts His Own Ideology

SHOTS
by July Bagirova
15.09.2020
In 2004 James Wan and Leigh Whannell introduced a new horror film Saw alongside with an ingeniously smart, creative and relentless killer – John Kramer or Jigsaw, portrayed by Tobin Bell.

Unlike most killers, Jigsaw never intends to kill his subjects; the purpose of his tests is to see whether the subject has enough willpower to live. He believes that such an experience will show them what the value of life is. In Kramer's mind the deaths of those participants who fail are considered justified, and it only proves that they don't deserve to live.

Fate played a sick joke on this man. After the miscarriage of his son Gideon, caused by an accidental drug addict Cecil Adams and his lover Amanda Young, Kramer nearly lost his mind. What is more, later he found out that he has an inoperable brain tumour. He attempted to commit suicide by trying to crash a car he's driving, but unexpectedly survived. It led him to a new understanding of life and creating his own ideology about life and death. This ideology stated: "Once you see death up close, then you know what the value of life is." It seemed like Kramer had always sticked to his own rules. Or had he?
1. «I've never murdered anyone in my life»
This quote isn't appropriate and it doesn't excuse Kramer's ideology of appreciating life. In the first film Lawrence Gordon says: "Technically speaking, he's not really a murderer, he never killed anyone. He finds ways for his victims to kill themselves." Even considering dr. Gordon's words, Jigsaw is still the one responsible for all the deaths. Acting through somebody else, or killing people with traps in no way diminishes his blame. It makes him a real murderer.
2. Deliberately impossible conditions for survival in some tests
John often says that the victim can survive all his traps if she or he has enough willpower and passion for life. But what about the Saw VI (2009) where the main game is held for an insurance agent Willian Easton? The first test is focused on "the simple element of air". Once the game begins, Easton takes a breath, every now and then the clamps around his chest close in and crush his body. But the point is that his opponent in the first challenge is an innocent 52-year-old janitor from his company. This man has been taken because even though he had a history of high blood pressure and heart disease, he continued to smoke. Among other victims we see murderers, rapists, mentally unstable or boasting people, liars and addicts. Then what makes the janitor a candidate for the ruthless game? Jigsaw knew that the poor man simply won't be able to cope with this trap, so it automatically made William the winner of the first challenge, which doesn't sound fair at all.

Also, in the first film one of the main characters was Adam, a photographer hired by detective David Tapp in order to follow Dr. Lawrence Gordon. He was kidnapped by Amanda Young and placed in a game alongside with Gordon. Both players were chained to pipes on opposite sides of the room and given instructions on how to survive. Adam just had to escape, but he could find neither the key, nor enough will to cut his leg. However, later Jigsaw revealed to Adam that the key to his chain was in the bathtub that went down the drain when he first woke up. It was nearly impossible to reach the key after waking up in a bath filled with water because the main concern was simply breathing. Adam initially had a very small chance of catching or even noticing the key and therefore escaping chains around his ankle.
3. Killing the cops
Apart from Eric Matthews whose blame is undeniable to the viewers Jigsaw caused deaths of other policemen. When detective Sing pursued Jigsaw, he was killed by a shotgun trap. Allison Kerry was killed by a trap tearing her rib cage apart. Commander Rigg, who understood the value of life, was forced to play the game because he was just doing his job – trying to save everyone. In Saw IV (2004) he was put through four trials, through which he had to understand Jigsaw's methods. He suffered from a gunshot wound to the stomach in his final test and died from blood loss. Agent Peter Strahm's background isn't shown in the film. He was doing his job well, and not trusting Jigsaw in the Saw V (2008) (which led to Strahm's death) is still understandable. How can you trust a serial killer, trying to demolish all your colleagues, involved in the investigation?
4. A challenge, disproportionate to the victim's guilt


The unknown man from the first Saw, Mark, was forced to accomplish an almost impossible mission - to find a code on the walls among numbers written all over them to open the safe with an antidote. The tape recorder explained why Mark was captured - according to Jigsaw's words, he was pretending to be sick for quite a long time, so Kramer suggested "putting Mark's so-called illness to the test". However, considering next challenges, this one was too exaggerated. The consequences of Mark's actions weren't shown in the film, so we can't guess whether he was truly making profit of the fake illness.

What is more, the room was filled with broken glass scattered all across the floor, and Mark was covered in flammable substance and had half of the burning candle in the room. This seems like an appropriate test for a man just pretending to be sick, doesn't it?

In the same film we also see Zep, an orderly who worked at St. Eustice Hospital where John Kramer was being treated for his cancer. He formed a bond with John while he was being treated, but John considered him to have "issues of his own". But we never got a chance to learn more about these issues and therefore, the blame of this man is unjustified. Looks like John chose this man randomly – to make everyone believe that Zep himself is Jigsaw. An orderly had to accomplish several complicated tasks in order to obtain the antidote for the slow-acting poison in his blood: monitoring Adam and Dr. Lawrence Gordon's game, holding Alison and Diana Gordon captive, while waiting for doctor to fail his test. In addition, there was Tapp chasing him. All that led to Zep's death – he got beaten to death by Adam.
5. Murdering and torturing innocent people


This point is close to the second one, but, in some of Jigsaw's games, victims didn't even have a chance to free themselves, fight for their life or "make their own choices" – for instance, the last test for Bobby Dagen, the author of a self-help book based on his accounts of surviving a Jigsaw trap. In reality, however, he made the entire story up in order to find quick fame. In that challenge he needed to rescue his wife, Joyce, chained to a strange platform, but Bobby failed the test. As a result, an innocent woman, who was unaware of Bobby's campaign and all fraud, was burned in the brazen bull. Even though it wasn't her test, she didn't deserve such a fate.

Sometimes Jigsaw or his disciples kidnap innocent relatives of those, who need to pass his or her tests. In the first film the wife and daughter of Lawrence Gordon, Alison and Diana are held hostage by Zep Hindle as a part of Lawrence's test. When Lawrence fails his test, Zep attempts to kill both Alison and Diana, but fortunately they are rescued by Detective Tapp. After that situation Alison and Lawrence got divorced. It is hard to imagine the fear and stress they had to experience and all the dire consequences.
Speaking of Kramer's ideology, the franchise doesn't have many illogical moments, It can still be considered a cruel and merciless one, but nevertheless, it is thoughtful and well-designed. Jigsaw foresaw a lot of actions coming from policemen, players and those who played with fate, and Kramer definitely made his moves cautiously, staying unknown to the press, but making others tremble in fear.
 
5 Situations When John Kramer Contradicts His Own Ideology

SHOTS
by July Bagirova
15.09.2020
In 2004 James Wan and Leigh Whannell introduced a new horror film Saw alongside with an ingeniously smart, creative and relentless killer - John Kramer or Jigsaw, portrayed by Tobin Bell.

Unlike most killers, Jigsaw never intends to kill his subjects; the purpose of his tests is to see whether the subject has enough willpower to live. He believes that such an experience will show them what the value of life is. In Kramer's mind the deaths of those participants who fail are considered justified, and it only proves that they don't deserve to live.

Fate played a sick joke on this man. After the miscarriage of his son Gideon, caused by an accidental drug addict Cecil Adams and his lover Amanda Young, Kramer nearly lost his mind. What is more, later he found out that he has an inoperable brain tumour. He attempted to commit suicide by trying to crash a car he's driving, but unexpectedly survived. It led him to a new understanding of life and creating his own ideology about life and death. This ideology stated: "Once you see death up close, then you know what the value of life is." It seemed like Kramer had always sticked to his own rules. Or had he?
1. «I've never murdered anyone in my life»
This quote isn't appropriate and it doesn't excuse Kramer's ideology of appreciating life. In the first film Lawrence Gordon says: "Technically speaking, he's not really a murderer, he never killed anyone. He finds ways for his victims to kill themselves." Even considering dr. Gordon's words, Jigsaw is still the one responsible for all the deaths. Acting through somebody else, or killing people with traps in no way diminishes his blame. It makes him a real murderer.
2. Deliberately impossible conditions for survival
in some tests
John often says that the victim can survive all his traps if she or he has enough willpower and passion for life. But what about the Saw VI (2009) where the main game is held for an insurance agent Willian Easton? The first test is focused on "the simple element of air". Once the game begins, Easton takes a breath, every now and then the clamps around his chest close in and crush his body. But the point is that his opponent in the first challenge is an innocent 52-year-old janitor from his company. This man has been taken because even though he had a history of high blood pressure and heart disease, he continued to smoke. Among other victims we see murderers, rapists, mentally unstable or boasting people, liars and addicts. Then what makes the janitor a candidate for the ruthless game? Jigsaw knew that the poor man simply won't be able to cope with this trap, so it automatically made William the winner of the first challenge, which doesn't sound fair at all.

Also, in the first film one of the main characters was Adam, a photographer hired by detective David Tapp in order to follow Dr. Lawrence Gordon. He was kidnapped by Amanda Young and placed in a game alongside with Gordon. Both players were chained to pipes on opposite sides of the room and given instructions on how to survive. Adam just had to escape, but he could find neither the key, nor enough will to cut his leg. However, later Jigsaw revealed to Adam that the key to his chain was in the bathtub that went down the drain when he first woke up. It was nearly impossible to reach the key after waking up in a bath filled with water because the main concern was simply breathing. Adam initially had a very small chance of catching or even noticing the key and therefore escaping chains around his ankle.
3. Killing the cops
Apart from Eric Matthews whose blame is undeniable to the viewers Jigsaw caused deaths of other policemen. When detective Sing pursued Jigsaw, he was killed by a shotgun trap. Allison Kerry was killed by a trap tearing her rib cage apart. Commander Rigg, who understood the value of life, was forced to play the game because he was just doing his job – trying to save everyone. In Saw IV (2004) he was put through four trials, through which he had to understand Jigsaw's methods. He suffered from a gunshot wound to the stomach in his final test and died from blood loss. Agent Peter Strahm's background isn't shown in the film. He was doing his job well, and not trusting Jigsaw in the Saw V (2008) (which led to Strahm's death) is still understandable. How can you trust a serial killer, trying to demolish all your colleagues, involved in the investigation?
4. A challenge, disproportionate
to the victim's guilt
The unknown man from the first Saw, Mark, was forced to accomplish an almost impossible mission - to find a code on the walls among numbers written all over them to open the safe with an antidote. The tape recorder explained why Mark was captured - according to Jigsaw's words, he was pretending to be sick for quite a long time, so Kramer suggested "putting Mark's so-called illness to the test". However, considering next challenges, this one was too exaggerated. The consequences of Mark's actions weren't shown in the film, so we can't guess whether he was truly making profit of the fake illness.

What is more, the room was filled with broken glass scattered all across the floor, and Mark was covered in flammable substance and had half of the burning candle in the room. This seems like an appropriate test for a man just pretending to be sick, doesn't it?

In the same film we also see Zep, an orderly who worked at St. Eustice Hospital where John Kramer was being treated for his cancer. He formed a bond with John while he was being treated, but John considered him to have "issues of his own". But we never got a chance to learn more about these issues and therefore, the blame of this man is unjustified. Looks like John chose this man randomly – to make everyone believe that Zep himself is Jigsaw. An orderly had to accomplish several complicated tasks in order to obtain the antidote for the slow-acting poison in his blood: monitoring Adam and Dr. Lawrence Gordon's game, holding Alison and Diana Gordon captive, while waiting for doctor to fail his test. In addition, there was Tapp chasing him. All that led to Zep's death – he got beaten to death by Adam.
5. Murdering and torturing innocent people
This point is close to the second one, but, in some of Jigsaw's games, victims didn't even have a chance to free themselves, fight for their life or "make their own choices" – for instance, the last test for Bobby Dagen, the author of a self-help book based on his accounts of surviving a Jigsaw trap. In reality, however, he made the entire story up in order to find quick fame. In that challenge he needed to rescue his wife, Joyce, chained to a strange platform, but Bobby failed the test. As a result, an innocent woman, who was unaware of Bobby's campaign and all fraud, was burned in the brazen bull. Even though it wasn't her test, she didn't deserve such a fate.

Sometimes Jigsaw or his disciples kidnap innocent relatives of those, who need to pass his or her tests. In the first film the wife and daughter of Lawrence Gordon, Alison and Diana are held hostage by Zep Hindle as a part of Lawrence's test. When Lawrence fails his test, Zep attempts to kill both Alison and Diana, but fortunately they are rescued by Detective Tapp. After that situation Alison and Lawrence got divorced. It is hard to imagine the fear and stress they had to experience and all the dire consequences.
Speaking of Kramer's ideology, the franchise doesn't have many illogical moments, It can still be considered a cruel and merciless one, but nevertheless, it is thoughtful and well-designed. Jigsaw foresaw a lot of actions coming from policemen, players and those who played with fate, and Kramer definitely made his moves cautiously, staying unknown to the press, but making others tremble in fear.
Made on
Tilda